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Date:
May 17, 2021 - June 6, 2021
Time:
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Time Details:
Reduced visitor capacity and hours: please reserve. please reserve a time in advance, selecting one of six specific time slots: 10am, 11am, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm or 4pm.
Location:
Seaboard Station Railroad
Address:
326 North Main Street
Suffolk, VA 23434
Contact:
757-514-4135
Email:
Cost:
Admission is free but you must select a time slot in advance
MoveOverSirExhibit_Calendar
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"Move Over Sir! Women Working on the Railroad" - Traveling Exhibit on Display

Monday, May 17, 2021

A travelling exhibit from the Union Pacific Railroad Museum, “Move Over, Sir: Women Working on the Railroad” will be displayed at the Suffolk Seaboard Station Railroad Museum through Sunday, June 6, 2021. “Move Over, Sir!” traces the contributions that women have made to the railroad industry over the past 150 years, calling out specific women and their unique contributions to the industry. Each group wishing to view the exhibit may reserve up to eight guests. Visitors to the Museum are required to wear a mask while in the building and hand sanitizer has been made readily available.

Centuries of American history have seen gender wielded as a weapon to limit women’s opportunities within the workplace. Despite this, during wartime and periods of economic upheaval, women slowly transitioned into positions of authority, knowledge, and skill in all areas of the workforce – including at American railroads. In fact, women have served in critical railroad roles since the early 19th century, working to build America right alongside men.

When the railroad allowed the American public to move westward, it not only opened up possibilities for men seeking their fortunes, but also for women seeking opportunities outside of the home. In the late 1830s and 40s, telegraph lines expanded alongside new railroad tracks and

created new professional opportunities for women, despite continuing social norms discouraging women working outside of the home and interacting with the public. Early pioneer women telegraphers were still the exception rather than the rule, but they blazed a trail for women to follow in the century of progress to come.